4shared
Leading Real Estate Companies of the World Website Quality Certification Award

Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

The Importance of Using a Professional to Sell Your Home

Posted on: April 12th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

The Importance of Using a Professional to Sell Your Home | Keeping Current Matters

When a homeowner decides to sell their house, they obviously want the best possible price for it with the least amount of hassles along the way. However, for the vast majority of sellers, the most important result is actually getting their homes sold.

In order to accomplish all three goals, a seller should realize the importance of using a real estate professional. We realize that technology has changed the purchaser’s behavior during the home buying process. According to the National Association of Realtors’ 2016 Profile of Home Buyers & Sellers, the percentage of buyers who used the internet in their home search increased to 94%.

However, the report also revealed that 96% of buyers who used the internet when searching for homes purchased their homes through either a real estate agent/broker or from a builder or builder’s agent. Only 2% purchased their homes directly from a seller whom the buyer didn’t know.

Buyers search for a home online but then depend on an agent to find the home they will buy (50%), to negotiate the terms of the sale (47%) & price (36%), or to help understand the process (61%).

The plethora of information now available has resulted in an increase in the percentage of buyers that reach out to real estate professionals to “connect the dots.” This is obvious, as the percentage of overall buyers who have used agents to buy their homes has steadily increased from 69% in 2001.

Bottom Line

If you are thinking of selling your home, don’t underestimate the role a real estate professional can play in the process.


It’s a Seller’s Market! Should I Downsize Now?

Posted on: March 29th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

It's a Seller's Market! Should I Downsize Now? | Keeping Current Matters

A study by Edelman Berland reveals that 33% of homeowners who are contemplating selling their houses in the near future are planning to scale down. Let’s look at a few reasons why this might make sense for many homeowners, as the majority of the country is currently experiencing a seller’s market.

In a blog, Dave Ramsey, the financial guru, highlighted the advantages of selling your current house and downsizing into a smaller home that better serves your current needs. Ramsey explains three potential financial advantages to downsizing:

  1. A smaller home means less space, but it also means less time, stress and money spent on upkeep.
  2. Let’s assume you save $500 a month on your mortgage payment. In 30 years, you could have an additional $1–1.6 million in the bank to get you through your golden years.
  3. Use the proceeds from selling your current home to pay cash for a smaller one. Just imagine what you could do with no mortgage holding you down! If you can’t pay cash, aim for a 15-year fixed rate mortgage and put at least 10–20% down on your new home. Apply the $500 you saved from downsizing to your new monthly payment. At 3% interest, you could pay off a $200,000 mortgage in less than 10.5 years, saving almost $16,000 in the process.

Realtor.com also addressed downsizing in an article. They suggest that you ask yourself some questions before deciding if downsizing is right for you and your family. Here are two of their questions followed by their answers (in italics) and some additional information that could help.

Q: What kind of lifestyle do I want after I downsize?

A: “For some folks, it’s a matter of living a simpler life focused on family. Some might want to cross off travel destinations on their bucket lists. Some might want a low-maintenance community with high-end upgrades and social events. Decide what you want to achieve from your move first, and you’ll be able to better narrow down your housing options.”

Comments: Many homeowners are taking the profits from the sales of their current homes and splitting it in order to put down payments on smaller homes in their current locations, as well as on vacation/retirement homes where they plan to live when they retire.

This allows them to lock in the home price and mortgage interest rate at today’s values which makes sense financially as both home prices and interest rates are projected to rise.

Q: Have I built up enough equity in my current home to make a profit?

A: “For most homeowners, the answer is yes. This is if they’ve held on to their properties long enough to have positive equity that will be sizable enough to put a large down payment on their next home.”

Comments: A study by Fannie Mae revealed that only 37% of Americans believe that they have significant equity (> 20%) in their current home. In actuality, CoreLogic’s latest Equity Report revealed that 78.9% have greater than 20% equity. That equity could enable you to build the life you’ve always dreamt about.

Bottom Line

If you are debating downsizing your home and want to evaluate the options you currently have, meet with a real estate professional in your area who can help guide you through the process.

What Are the Experts Saying about Mortgage Rates?

Posted on: March 22nd, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

 

What Are the Experts Saying about Mortgage Rates? | Keeping Current Matters

Mortgage interest rates have risen over the last few months and projections are that they will continue their upswing throughout 2017. What impact will this have on the housing market? Here is what the experts are saying:

Laurie Goodman, Co-director of the Urban Institute’s Housing Finance Policy Center:

“In 1984, 1994, 2000, and 2013, every time we have rate increases, we have increases in nominal home prices. We expect this to be more pronounced, as there is a big demand-and-supply gap at the present time.”

Scott Anderson, Chief Economist for Bank of the West:

“The tightening labor market, rising wage growth, high levels of consumer confidence and a millennial generation with a pent-up demand for housing should allow the housing market to weather the storm of gradually rising interest rates.”

Ivy Zelman in her latest “Z” Report:

“Although we strongly believe that the housing supply-demand imbalance for single-family homes will continue to drive above-average home price appreciation, just as falling mortgage rates aided pricing power on the margin in recent months, we expect the opposite effect to become evident in the coming months. As such, we project year-end home price inflation of 4.8% for 2017 and 4.1% for 2018.”

Bob Walters, President & COO of retail mortgage lender Quicken Loans:

“A modest increase in mortgage rates won’t have much of an effect on home purchases. A buyer may need to slightly re-evaluate which homes they can afford, but it’s not likely to make an impact on qualifying, in most cases.”

First American Chief Economist Mark Fleming:

“Our survey data shows that mortgage rates would have to be significantly higher to have any meaningful impact. The house buying power that borrowers have, even with rates below five percent, still remains historically strong.”

Do you know how much your home’s value has gone up in the past year?

Posted on: February 23rd, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

February 20, 2017

Michele Corral

|2 M Corral Bus Card

With market fluctuation due to pre-election tumult in 2016, you may be surprised about what the value of your current home is.

 

Here is a chart showing the Median Sales Price for Residential properties in the greater OKC metro area from this last time last year through the end of January 2017.

 Last February, the median sold price was $185,000, but this January it was $199,900! That is a significant jump. Many buyers slowed looking at the end of the summer and the market was very hesitant through the election season.

This is an overall average of the swings of the housing market. However, the trend is definitely upward. It would be fantastic if I could just post an exact amount that YOUR home has gone up in value, but it’s just not that simple.

 

Buyers and lender appraisers factor in so many things that are unique to your home that sets it apart from a smaller property in a less convenient location without the updates or landscaping that you’ve toiled over. To get an accurate picture of a more precise current value for your home, I love to do the research to help my clients compare their home to recently sold similar homes nearby so that we can sell quickly and get top dollar for your home!

With unseasonally warm weather, buyers are coming back out and ready to purchase! If you’re considering selling this year, now is the perfect time to prepare.

 

4 Tips to Determine How Much Mortgage You Can Afford

Posted on: February 15th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

0430-Mortgage-Rates

By: G. M. Filisko

By knowing how much mortgage you can handle, you can ensure that home ownership will fit in your budget.

Homeownership should make you feel safe and secure, and that includes financially. Be sure you can afford your home by calculating how much of a mortgage you can safely fit into your budget.

Why not just take out the biggest mortgage a lender says you can have? Because your lender bases that number on a formula that doesn’t consider your current and future financial and personal goals.

Think ahead to major life events and consider how those might influence your budget. Do you want to return to school for an advanced degree? Will a new child add day care to your monthly expenses? Does a relative plan to eventually live with you and contribute to the mortgage?

Consider those lifestyle issues as you check out these four methods for estimating the amount of mortgage you can afford.

1. Prepare a Detailed Budget

The oldest rule of thumb says you can typically afford a home priced two to three times your gross income. So, if you earn $100,000, you can typically afford a home between $200,000 and $300,000.

But that’s not the best method because it doesn’t take into account your monthly expenses and debts. Those costs greatly influence how much you can afford. Let’s say you earn $100,000 a year but have $1,000 in monthly payments for student debt, car loans, and credit card minimum payments. You don’t have as much money to pay your mortgage as someone earning the same income with no debts.

Better option: Prepare a family budget that tallies your ongoing monthly bills for everything — credit cards, car and student loans, lunch at work, day care, date night, vacations, and savings.

See what’s left over to spend on homeownership costs, like your mortgage, property taxes, insurance, maintenance, utilities, and community association fees, if applicable.

2. Factor in Your Downpayment

How much money do you have for a downpayment? The higher your downpayment, the lower your monthly payments will be. If you put down at least 20% of the home’s cost, you may not have to get private mortgage insurance, which protects the lender if you default and costs hundreds each month. That leaves more money for your mortgage payment.

The lower your downpayment, the higher the loan amount you’ll need to qualify for and the higher your monthly mortgage payment.

But, if interest rates and/or home prices are rising and you wait to buy until you accumulate a bigger downpayment, you may end up paying more for your home.

3. Consider Your Overall Debt

Lenders generally follow the 43% rule. Your monthly mortgage payments covering your home loan principal, interest, taxes and insurance, plus all your other bills, like car loans, utilities, and credit cards, shouldn’t exceed 43% of your gross annual income.

Here’s an example of how the 43% calculation works for a homebuyer making $100,000 a year before taxes:

  1. Your gross annual income is $100,000.
  2. Multiply $100,000 by 43% to get $43,000 in annual income.
  3. Divide $43,000 by 12 months to convert the annual 43% limit into a monthly upper limit of $3,583.
  4. All your monthly bills including your potential mortgage can’t go above $3,583 per month.

You might find a lender willing to give you a mortgage with a payment that goes above the 43% line, but consider carefully before you take it. Evidence from studies of mortgage loans suggest that borrowers who go over the limit are more likely to run into trouble making monthly payments, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau warns.

4. Use Your Rent as a Mortgage Guide

The tax benefits of homeownership generally allow you to afford a mortgage payment — including taxes and insurance — of about one-third more than your current rent payment without changing your lifestyle. So you can multiply your current rent by 1.33 to arrive at a rough estimate of a mortgage payment.

Here’s an example: If you currently pay $1,500 per month in rent, you should be able to comfortably afford a $2,000 monthly mortgage payment after factoring in the tax benefits of homeownership.

However, if you’re struggling to keep up with your rent, buy a home that will give you the same payment rather than going up to a higher monthly payment. You’ll have additional costs for homeownership that your landlord now covers, like property taxes and repairs. If there’s no room in your budget for those extras, you could become financially stressed.

Also consider whether or not you’ll itemize your deductions. If you take the standard deduction, you can’t also deduct mortgage interest payments. Talking to a tax adviser, or using a tax software program to do a “what if” tax return, can help you see your tax situation more clearly.

Related: More on Mortgages from

Are You Getting the Home Tax Deductions You’re Entitled To?

Posted on: February 8th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

Taxes__JJAVA_-_Fotolia_large

By: Dona DeZube

Here are the tax tips you need to get a jump on your returns.

Owning a home can pay off at tax time.

Take advantage of these home ownership-related tax deductions and strategies to lower your tax bill:

Mortgage Interest Deduction

One of the neatest deductions itemizing homeowners can take advantage of is the mortgage interest deduction, which you claim on Schedule A. To get the mortgage interest deduction, your mortgage must be secured by your home — and your home can be a house, trailer, or boat, as long as you can sleep in it, cook in it, and it has a toilet.

Interest you pay on a mortgage of up to $1 million — or $500,000 if you’re married filing separately — is deductible when you use the loan to buy, build, or improve your home.

If you take on another mortgage (including a second mortgage, home equity loan, or home equity line of credit) to improve your home or to buy or build a second home, that counts towards the $1 million limit.

If you use loans secured by your home for other things — like sending your kid to college — you can still deduct the interest on loans up $100,000 ($50,000 for married filing separately) because your home secures the loan.

Prepaid Interest Deduction

Prepaid interest (or points) you paid when you took out your mortgage is generally 100% deductible in the year you paid it along with other mortgage interest.

If you refinance your mortgage and use that money for home improvements, any points you pay are also deductible in the same year.

But if you refinance to get a better rate or shorten the length of your mortgage, or to use the money for something other than home improvements, such as college tuition, you’ll need to deduct the points over the life of your mortgage. Say you refi into a 10-year mortgage and pay $3,000 in points. You can deduct $300 per year for 10 years.

So what happens if you refi again down the road?

Example: Three years after your first refi, you refinance again. Using the $3,000 in points scenario above, you’ll have deducted $900 ($300 x 3 years) so far. That leaves $2,400, which you can deduct in full the year you complete your second refi. If you paid points for the new loan, the process starts again; you can deduct the points over the life of the loan.

Home mortgage interest and points are reported on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040.

Your lender will send you a Form 1098 that lists the points you paid. If not, you should be able to find the amount listed on the HUD-1 settlement sheet you got when you closed the purchase of your home or your refinance closing.

{{ include_video tax-deductions-homeowners }}

Property Tax Deduction

You can deduct on Schedule A the real estate property taxes you pay. If you have a mortgage with an escrow account, the amount of real estate property taxes you paid shows up on your annual escrow statement.

If you bought a house this year, check your HUD-1 settlement statement to see if you paid any property taxes when you closed the purchase of your house. Those taxes are deductible on Schedule A, too.

PMI and FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

You can deduct the cost of private mortgage insurance (PMI) as mortgage interest on Schedule A if you itemize your return. The change only applies to loans taken out in 2007 or later.

What’s PMI? If you have a mortgage but didn’t put down a fairly good-sized down payment (usually 20%), the lender requires the mortgage be insured. The premium on that insurance can be deducted, so long as your income is less than $100,000 (or $50,000 for married filing separately).

If your adjusted gross income is more than $100,000, your deduction is reduced by 10% for each $1,000 ($500 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return) that your adjusted gross income exceeds $100,000 ($50,000 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return). So, if you make $110,000 or more, you can’t claim the deduction (10% x 10 = 100%).

Besides private mortgage insurance, there’s government insurance from FHA, VA, and the Rural Housing Service. Some of those premiums are paid at closing, and deducting them is complicated. A tax adviser or tax software program can help you calculate this deduction. Also, the rules vary between the agencies.

Vacation Home Tax Deductions

The rules on tax deductions for vacation homes are complicated. Do yourself a favor and keep good records about how and when you use your vacation home.

If you’re the only one using your vacation home (you don’t rent it out for more than 14 days a year), you deduct mortgage interest and real estate taxes on Schedule A.

Rent your vacation home out for more than 14 days and use it yourself fewer than 15 days (or 10% of total rental days, whichever is greater), and it’s treated like a rental property. Your expenses are deducted on Schedule E.

Rent your home for part of the year and use it yourself for more than the greater of 14 days or 10% of the days you rent it and you have to keep track of income, expenses, and allocate them based on how often you used and how often you rented the house.

Homebuyer Tax Credit

This isn’t a deduction, but it’s important to keep track of if you claimed it in 2008.

There were federal first-time homebuyer tax credits in 2008, 2009, and 2010.

If you claimed the homebuyer tax credit for a purchase made after April 8, 2008, and before Jan. 1, 2009, you must repay 1/15th of the credit over 15 years, with no interest.

The IRS has a tool you can use to help figure out what you owe each year until it’s paid off. Or if the home stops being your main home, you may need to add the remaining unpaid credit amount to your income tax on your next tax return.

Generally, you don’t have to pay back the credit if you bought your home in 2009, 2010, or early 2011. The exception: You have to repay the full credit amount if you sold your house or stopped using it as primary residence within 36 months of the purchase date. Then you must repay it with your tax return for the year the home stopped being your principal residence.

The repayment rules are less rigorous for uniformed service members, Foreign Service workers, and intelligence community workers who got sent on extended duty at least 50 miles from their principal residence.

Energy-Efficiency Upgrades

The Nonbusiness Energy Tax Credit lets you claim a credit for installing energy-efficient home systems. Tax credits are especially valuable because they let you offset what you owe the IRS dollar for dollar, in this case, for up to 10% of the amount you spent on certain upgrades.

The credit carries a lifetime cap of $500 (less for some products), so if you’ve used it in years past, you’ll have to subtract prior tax credits from that $500 limit. Lucky for you, there’s no cap on how much you’ll save on utility bills thanks to your energy-efficiency upgrades.

Among the upgrades that might qualify for the credit:

  • Biomass stoves
  • Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning
  • Insulation
  • Roofs (metal and asphalt)
  • Water heaters (non-solar)
  • Windows, doors, and skylights

File IRS Form 5695 with your return.

Related: A Homeowner’s Guide to Taxes

This article provides general information about tax laws and consequences, but shouldn’t be relied upon as tax or legal advice applicable to particular transactions or circumstances. Consult a tax professional for such advice; tax laws may vary by jurisdiction.

Tax Refund: Down Payment or Selling Point

Posted on: January 18th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

January 14, 2017

By: Michele Corral, Realtor®️

 

Tax Season is upon us. Where will you get a bigger bang for your buck when spending your tax dollars: Putting it toward a down payment on a new home or Sprucing up your current home to sell more quickly and for top dollar?

pig 

Investing Your Refund to Prepare for Sell

What do the homes that sell the fastest (under contract in less than two weeks) this time of year have in common?

~Fresh paint. Be sure to choose fresh, lightening colors. A soft, neutral grey is very popular among buyers and designers. If you choose the right shade, it can bring a feeling a warmth and brightness to your home, and can create a clean contrast between the trim, flooring or ceiling in your home that will appeal to the buyer and help those features stand out. (I love to use Sherwin Williams because they have high-quality paint and often have weekend discounts or coupons)

~Clean floors. Hardwood, new or freshly steamed carpet, or updated tile are the most popular features for buyers looking for a move-in ready home. I encourage my clients to consult a flooring expert about the cost, durability and look of a vinyl, engined, and hardwood floor to see which choice makes the most sense for your area and budget.

~Energy Efficient upgrades. Whether you decide to just upgrade the lighting to help your home photograph and seem nice and bright, or you take the opportunity to upgrade that finicky appliance, your investment will definitely appeal to buyers.

 

For More Information about the best option for investing your tax refund, continue reading.

 

Having the home of your dreams or even the home of your functional goals is all about you. Consulting professional advice from mortgage professionals, flooring or paint experts, or even a Realtor should always lead back to what is of most benefit to you. We are all here to provide you with a service to help achieve your goals!

 

For me personally, I find it FUN to compare similar recently sold properties and research the details of each sale to find out what are the most appealing features and create a marketing plan for my clients that will get their home sold quickly and for top dollar. Does that make me a ‘housing nerd’? Maybe. But it definitely helps me bring you fantastic service with a smile.

 

Michele Corral, Realtor®️

Crossland Real Estate

realtormicheleokc@gmail.com

facebook: Michele Corral, Realtor   instagram: realtormicheleokc

3 Tips for Making Your Dream of Buying a Home Come True

Posted on: January 11th, 2017 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

3 Tips for Making Your Dream of Buying a Home Come True [INFOGRAPHIC] | MyKCM

Some Highlights:

  • Realtor.com recently shared “5 Habits to Start Now If You Hope to Buy a Home in 2017.”
  • Setting up an automatic savings plan that saves a small amount of every check is one of the best ways to save without thinking a lot about it.
  • Living within a budget now will help you save money for down payments and pay down other debts that might be holding you back

Christmas Lighting Tips to Save Time and Money

Posted on: December 21st, 2016 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

By: Lisa Kaplan Gordon

Here’s how to light up your Christmas light display safely and economically.

Christmas lights can be modest displays to show good cheer, or million-bulb light-apaloozas that draw gawkers from near and far.

Here are some tips on how to get the most from — and spend the least on — your holiday display.

1. Safety First

Emergency rooms are filled with homeowners who lose fights with their holiday lights and fall off ladders or suffer electric shocks. To avoid the holiday black and blues, never hang lights solo; instead, work with a partner who holds the ladder. Also, avoid climbing on roofs after rain or snow.

2. Unpack Carefully

Lights break and glass cuts. So unpack your lights gingerly, looking for and replacing broken bulbs along the way.

3. Extension Cords Are Your Friends

Splurge on heavy-duty extension cords that are UL-listed for outdoor use. To avoid overloading, only link five strings of lights together before plugging into an extension cord.

4. LEDs Cost Less to Light

LED Christmas lights use roughly 70% to 90% less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. You can safely connect many more LED light strings than incandescents. Downside: Some think they don’t burn as brightly as incandescent bulbs.

5. Solar Lights Cost Nothing to Run

Solar Christmas lights are roughly four times more expensive to buy than LEDs, but they cost zero to run. They’re a bright-burning, green alternative. Downside: If there’s no sun during the day, there’s no light at night. The jury’s also still out on how long they last; they’re too new on the market for results.

6. Dismantle Lights Sooner Than Later

Sun, wind, rain, and snow all take their toll on Christmas lights. To extend the life of lights, take them down immediately after the holidays. The longer you leave the up, the sooner you’ll have to replace them.

7. Plan Next Year’s Display on Dec. 26

Shop the after-Christmas sales to get the best prices on lights and blowups that you can proudly display next year. Stock up on your favorite lights so you’ll have spares when you need them (and after they’re discontinued).

8. Permanent Attachments Save Time

If you know you’ll always hang lights from eaves, install permanent light clips ($13 for 75 clips) that will save you hanging time each year. You’ll get a couple/three years out of the clips before sun eats the plastic.

9. Find Those Blueprints

Instead of guessing how many light strings you’ll need, or measuring with a tape, dig up your house blueprints or house location drawings (probably with your closing papers) and use those measurements as a guide.

10. Store Them in a Ball

It sounds counterintuitive, but the best way to store lights is to ball them up. Wrap five times in one direction, then turn the ball 90 degrees and repeat. Store your light balls in cardboard boxes, rather than in plastic bags: Cardboard absorbs residual moisture and extends the life of your lights.

Related: Holiday Lighting Safety Checklist

Entrepreneurs and Your Home Loan

Posted on: December 15th, 2016 by Aimee Crossland No Comments

dooor

What you need to know as an independent contractor or self-employed worker before you decide to buy a new home.

By: Michele Corral, Realtor®️
Entrepreneurship or even a side hustle can be exhilarating and give a sense of independence when you experience success. With the rise of the Gig Economy, many people are joining the movement to #beyourownboss. Increased flexibility and and the ability to work and earn at your own pace are excellent benefits to being an independent contractor. With all that cash flow and flexibility, you may want to move up in house or find a new place that has the perfect space for your in-home business.

Before You Find The One
What do you need to know before you start shopping for that extra room?  Whether it be a perfect LuLaRoe closet, space to Study with high-speed wifi, or a perfect home Elizabeth Banks is waiting to show you on realtor.com, go into the search financially well-educated.

What will a Lender look for?
When you are looking to own a home and obtain a loan, lenders will look at the some of the following items:

 

  • Credit Score
  • Cash available for down payment and Closing Costs
  • Increasing Income
  • Existing Debt and Financial Obligations
  • Work History

 

Debt and financial obligation examples would include credit cards, car loans, student loans, consumer loans, child support, alimony.

The Housing Expense-to-Income-Ratio -A ratio comparing housing expenses to before-tax income that is used by lenders to qualify borrowers for a mortgage.

The housing expense measure includes mortgage principal, interest payments, property taxes, hazard insurance, mortgage insurance and association fees. A higher ratio may be accepted based on compensating factors such as a low loan-to-value ratio and/or an excellent credit history, or applying jointly with a co-borrower. It is sometimes referred to as the “front ratio”.

The Debt-to-Income Ratio – a comparison or ratio of gross income to housing and non-housing expenses It is sometimes referred to as the “back-end ratio”.

Documented Income
When you become self-employed or have 1099 income, lenders will be expecting you to document your income. If you just started in the last 4 months and have a booming business, your lender may not be as excited as you. Underwriters are looking for two years of federal tax returns. They will average the two years and are also looking for an increasing or steady income, rather than a decrease. To a lender, decreasing income will make you seem like a greater risk, and may result in your pre-approval or loan application being turned down.

Deductions
Watch out for deducting too much on your taxes. The lender can only count your net income, not your gross sales. So, although you may be able to deduct all kinds of business expenses, it would be wise to look at it from the lender’s perspective and how much money you will have leftover to pay a mortgage. The one exception to this is mileage. They are often able to give a credit for deducted mileage.

If you have questions about your specific situation, contact Brian Rulison at The Federal Savings Bank before you are ready to start packing. And, kudos to you for taking your future in your own hands. Now, get back out there and enjoy your hustle.

Michele Corral, Realtor®️

Crossland Real Estate

mcorral@gocrossland.com

facebook: Michele Corral, Realtor

instagram: realtormicheleokc

2 M Corral Bus Card

Loan Calculator

Monthly Payment:

CROSS TOWN OR CROSS COUNTRY... WE MAKE IT HAPPEN! 405-604-6800

LIST YOUR HOME TODAY!